A stolen cup for stolen afternoons

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My favourite modern tea-cup.

‘Naturally, I protested, a bit, but then I took it home…’

The 700th time I admired this cup and saucer, my cousin gave it to me.

I didn’t mean to make him do it, but I couldn’t contain myself every time I saw it in his kitchen cupboard. I mean, look at it! It’s the kind of cup that makes you happy.

Paul is my antiques-fair buddy, and while he doesn’t share my thing with cups, he does understand what it’s like to become obsessed with an object. And so one day he opened the china cabinet door, took it out, and gave it to me.

Naturally, I protested, a bit, but then I took it home and now it’s my favourite modern cup and saucer. It gets everything right – balance, feel, weight, aesthetics – it’s the cup I sit down with in the sunshine in the middle of the afternoon, when no-one else is around, and let the day’s busyness go. It’s my time-out cup, my lovely afternoon cup, my reliable cup.

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It’s made by T2, which is an Australian tea-brewing company (it came with an infuser and a box of tea – more on that another time), and, sadly, doesn’t seem to be available any more.

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And yes, Paul is allowed to use it when he visits.

I’m not mad, it’s science

 

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A hydrologist explains why cups matter.

August 16, 2017: ¬†I have been known to get a little tetchy if I’m served tea in coffee cups, especially those thick, heavy, shallow ones designed for drinking flat whites and the like.

Well, I have science on my side. I was sitting at the Freshbites cafe at Wellington airport today with three scientists when my tea arrived – served in a well-shaped, reasonably thin, teacup!

Rudely, I interupted our conversation about serious environmental issues to let out a whoop of pleasure. Earlier in the day, I had had breakfast with my brother at Loretta in Cuba St. It was a superb meal (poached egg on Loretta’s own seeded bread, free-range bacon, tomatoes and basil with a drizzle of olive oil and balsamic) but it was seriously let down by the cup the tea was served in.

You can read my complaints here. Suffice to say that it’s not a good idea to mess with my first tea of the day.

But here I was, in an airport of all places, being given a half-decent cup.

I took a photo and started babbling on about cups that make your tea cold. One of the scientists, hydrologist Dugald MacTavish (he knows about water) became interested.

“You’re right,” he said, muttering something about surface-to-volume ratio, so I got him to write it down in my notebook. Now, whenever I’m given tea in an inappropriate cup, I will fling that phrase at the perps, followed by my notebook if they don’t listen.

*You can read my review of the tea at Freshbites here.