horeke oustercatchers
Tōrea (variable oustercatchers) on the wharf near the Horeke Hotel.

If this hotel were any more waterfront, it would be in the water.

It’s a pretty safe bet they’ve been serving tea at the Horeke pub for nearly 200 years.

The sign out the front mentions only beer, but what homesick missionary, bushman, sailor or ship builder wouldn’t have been hanging out for a nice cup of Rosie Lee to start the day, even if they ended the day with something stronger?

It’s a sultry day in late summer when we visit, the sky and the water both full to bursting. We’re too early for lunch (the pub doesn’t open until 12) so we walk around the harbour, startling the seagulls and annoying the oystercatchers.

horeke ship sign

The Horeke Hotel has been on the same site since 1826 – 14 years before the signing of Te Tiriti O Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi between Maori and Queen Victoria), just 50 years after the signing of the American Declaration of Independence and the same year that Australia got its first street light (in Sydney; it burned whale oil).

In Paihia, just 45 minutes from Horeke today by car, but in those days a difficult journey through dense bush or several days’ sail), the first ship built in New Zealand, the Herald, was launched.

Horeke was in the game the following year with 50 men working in the Raine, Ramsay and Browne shipyard, building the schooner Enterprise (1827), the brigantine New Zealander (1828) and the three-masted ship Sir George Murray (1830).

The shipyard site, close to the hotel, was excavated by archaeologists in 2016.

Today, Horeke has a population of fewer than 400 people

My marks out of 10?

Cup 3. Simon Gualt cup and saucer. A bit heavy, but an attempt at doing it right.

Tea 2: Chanui English breakfast. This is hard to score. New barmaid Nicola hasn’t made tea before, and it shows. But on the plus side, she has the gumption to ‘fess up and ask me how it is. I try to be honest but encouraging. She’s made it in the cup and there’s too much milk. However, she listens carefully to my description of how I make tea, and says that’s what she’ll do next time. And the food (pub grub) is delicious.

horeke wharf and sky
Seaside seat on the deak.
horeke outside
The hotel is a mish-mash of old buildings, nestled by the sea.
horeke hall
A renovated part of the hotel.

Setting 10: If you were any more waterfront, you’d be in the water. I can’t help worrying about what will happen to the old hotel as the Hokianga Harbour creeps up as a result of climate change-induced sea-level rise (it’s not just the melting polar caps and glaciers causing the sea to rise; as water gets warmer it expands, a process known as thermal expansion). The hotel itself has been renovated in parts, in a 20-year project by the owners. The bits that haven’t been done-up add to the charm. But for now, to sit in the sun on the deck overlooking the harbour, which on this day is silent and still except for the birds, makes coming so far north worth the while.

Dog-friendly? Yes

Open after 3pm? Yes

horeke mangroves
Mangroves – so Northland. And they help counter the impacts of climate change.
horeke sign 2
Serving beer – and tea – for nearly 200 years.

Horeke Hotel, 2118 Horeke Road, Horeke, Hokianga Harbour, Northland

4 thoughts on “Horeke Hotel, Hokianga

  1. We do actually serve tea in tea pots however Nicola didn’t know this. We can provide Earl Grey as well as a range of Herbal teas.

    1. That’s great to hear – an excuse to come back and try it! Nicola was lovely and gave us great service in every other way.

  2. I stayed at the Horeke Hotel after biking the Coast to Coast bike trail recently. I rated this trip as one of my finest in recent times, largely due to the setting and hospitality at Horeke Hotel. Nicole had started working there the day before and had cooked the most amazing meal for us .. the chowder was mind blowing! The owner (sorry I forget his name) served us breakfast the next day and told us about the local history. Fasinating! I did not try the tea but your account of Nicole listening and taking your suggestions onboard fits in with the way all staff were during my stay. A treasure in the Hokianga!

    1. It sure is Al. That part of the world is so lovely and under-appreciated. Did you get to the gumfields?

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